How To Camp In The Desert: A Non Expert Guide

How To Camp In The Desert: A Non Expert Guide

How To Camp In The Desert

We were out camping this weekend in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Right now there’s a statewide fire ban, so a campfire in the evening to cook on was not an option. The reason is that it’s too dry. Well, that got me thinking about the desert because a desert is super dry. Can you have a fire there? I don’t know the answer to that, so I’m going to look into desert camping a bit.

Desert camping is not a trip for the faint of heart. You have the sun bearing down on you almost continuously during the day and it’s tough to find any shade to protect yourself during those hours. Food, water, and shelter are tough to find unless you bring the gear yourself. Depending on what part of the world you are camping in, different natural resources will be at hand. If desert camping is a recreation that you are interested in doing, stay tuned and pay attention to this article. It will give you some guidance, some tips, and hopefully a little confidence to help you on your way to a fantastic journey!

What is a Desert?

Deserts, in general cover about one-fifth of the world’s surface. Extreme environments and lack of precipitation cause these areas to have minimal plant life and animal life. The plants and animals that are there have adapted over the years to survive in such a harsh environment.

Many people have the perception that deserts are very hot and dry areas, and that’s true for the majority of them. But some deserts are very cold and covered in ice and are very baron.

Planet earth has four main types of deserts:

Coastal Desert

These deserts usually sit on the western coastline of continents. They are generally between 20 degrees and 30 degrees latitude, and the wind blows from the East which prevents moisture from coming onto land. Also, that’s what creates the dry environment. These type of deserts usually have cold winters and warm summers. An example of a coastal desert is the Atacama Desert in Chile.

Cold Winter Desert

The Great Basin and the Colorado Plateau in the red desert, are cold winter deserts in the United States. These type of deserts usually have long dry summers and very cold winters with minimal amounts of rain and snowfall. This makes them considered a semi-arid style of a desert.

The minimal amount of rainfall in these cold deserts are often caused by what’s called the rainshadow effect. This happens when the mountains are so high they keep the moisture from coming into the area.

Cold Weather Sleeping Bag at Amazon

Polar Desert 

There are very few polar deserts. They are only found in the Arctic and Antarctic regions. Like all deserts, they get very little precipitation and have very little plant and animal life.

Subtropical Desert 

When you think of a desert, a subtropical is what you’re most likely to think about. These are they very very hot deserts. These are the big boys. They are found in Asia, Australia, Africa, North, and South America. The Sonoran Desert and Mohave are probably the most popular in the United States.

Moisture in these areas comes in such a small amount that when it does fall it dries and evaporates before it even hits the ground. The plant life and animals have evolved to be able to retain moisture and hunt and move around at night so they don’t have to be out in the sun during the day.

Camping in the Desert

Camping in any of the areas mentioned above is going to be an excellent experience if planed correctly. Anywhere that moisture is between 1 and 16 inches in a year or considered desert-like conditions.

You will need to pack according to wherever you’re going. That means having your warm clothes for the night because in the desert the temperature can drop 30 to 40 degrees, if not more. It could be a hundred plus in the afternoon and drop down to 50 or 40 degrees in the night time, which if you’re not packed correctly for, could cause real issues.

Grab your compass here

The desert is relentless and it has killed many people over the years, so be careful. Make sure you let family and friends know where you will be and make sure you’re prepared. If all those things are checked off, you should have a great experience and most likely want to come back to the desert.

 

Remember always document your expeditions and trips. Take as many pictures as possible and write down in your journals whatever you do to keep those memories. Because, I promise you, in the future, you will want to look back and show your family, friends, and everyone else who will listen.

More: Mandatory Camping Gear

What Kind of Gear do I Need To Camp in the Desert?

Clothing

When it comes to clothing, you want to be careful what you bring you don’t want to over pack for your trip, but you also don’t want to under pack. You’re going to want to bring t-shirts and shorts and flip-flops, but I’m telling you, you don’t want those for your main attire. The sun is hot, it will burn you and it will suck the moisture right out of your body. What you need are articles of clothing that will retain the moisture inside. Shirts that cover your arms, your neck, and your midsection and pants that cover all the way to your ankles. Socks that wick away all your sweat and keep your feet dry because wet feet in the desert cause serious issues.

Desert boots from Amazon

You also wanted pack warm things like fleece jackets, wool sweaters, and any type of synthetic like a rain jacket. Anything that will breathe well. Here’s a list of a standard pack for a desert camping trip. Certain things are optional and certain things are mandatory. Depending on where you’re going, you’re going to have to make that call.

More: Dispersed Camping For Noobs

Base Layer

  • synthetic undergarments
  • long john set top/bottom medium weight
  • breathable t-shirts
  • synthetic liner gloves
  • wool or synthetic socks (2 per day)

Outerwear

  • waterproof pants/shirts/jackets
  • breathable synthetic or softshell hiking shirts/pants/shorts/
  • large brimmed hat/bandana/beanie
  • hiking Boots/waterproof shoes/sandals

Extras

  • waterbottles
  • tarps
  • sunglasses
  • sunscreen
  • camera
  • map
  • gps
  • compass
  • paracord 550lb
  • insect repellent

More: 12 Essential Camping Items

Camping Gear

  • single wall tent ( protect from dust )
  • first-aid kit
  • personal medications
  • toiletries/shovel
  • hiking backpack
  • sleeping bag (-30° to 20°F)
  • sleeping pad/mattress
  • stove and fuel
  • lighter and waterproof matches
  • cookset/eating utensils
  • lanterns/headlamps/batteries/fuel
  • water filters and additives
  • multitool/knife

MORE: Camping with a two-year-old

How to Set up a Camp in the Desert?

Another thing to remember about deserts is the flash flooding. The ground is hard and there’s a lot of dried-up river banks and Ravines. When it rains, where you put your tent could mean life or death. A flash flood can happen in a matter of minutes and if your asleep and that happens, it’s trouble. Look for a high spot to pitch your tent.

The desert floor is made of mostly rock. It’s going to be pretty hard. So a pad or mattresses is recommended. Your tent or sleeping situation should be stable and able to keep you warm enough for the chilly night. Ultralight Desert tent here

Campfires 

Campfires are nice but not always needed in the desert. For a comforting effect they are nice to have and to keep critters away and what have you. Cooking over a fire is great too if that’s the type of food you will be bringing.

More: Dogs and Bears when Camping

Water 

A fire is almost always a good idea for boiling out the contaminants in water, that is if you don’t have any filtration systems along with you. Water can be tough to find in the desert and dehydration is a killer.

The body sweats heavily in the dry climates and can leave you extremely thirsty very fast. The obvious thing to do is drink your water. However, be careful and ration your water when you’re on hikes or out on a day trip in the desert. Try not to drink everything you have on the first leg or your trip. Be smart and make sure you have plenty of drinking water with you at all times.

Lighting 

Lighting is invaluable. If you have battery-powered lanterns and headlamp lights that they make these days, you’re in luck. They are bright and last a very long time. For setting up camp after dark to walking away from camp to use the bathroom. They are handy and cheap enough to stock up on.

Where can you camp in the desert

There are many places in the world that you can plan a desert camping trip. However, here are my favorite five in the United States. They can be beautiful and at the same time, show no mercy to its inhabitants. Respect the regions and wilderness and enjoy what Planet Earth has given us.

More: High Altitude Camping

Saguaro National Park

Located in Tucson, Arizona, the giant Saguaro is the largest cacti in the United States. Named after the cactus is the beautiful and relentless desert of Saguaro National Park. The weather here is relatively mild compared to other deserts in the United States with wintertime temperatures getting as high as 70 and as low as 50 to the summertime highs of over a hundred down to the mid-80s. The best time to come camping is in the springtime.

Reserve now

Joshua Tree National Park

What can I say, this place is incredible! It’s open year-round to the public and it’s about 800,000 acres of awesomeness. Joshua Tree is one of the most visited deserts in the United States with just a few hours drive from Los Angeles, Vegas, and Phoenix. It gets almost three million visitors a year. Besides camping, there is also hiking, photography opportunities, and many rock climbing areas. This desert is the busiest through the months of October through May when it’s not as hot.

reserve now

Canyonlands National Park

This desert is also open year-round with an approximate 338,000 acres of land and water. Canyonlands is divided into three different sections by two different rivers. The Green and the Colorado River split the park up. The three parts of the park are Island in the Sky, The Maze, and The Needles with the Island in the sky being the most challenging area to recreate it. This desert is among the most challenging of this list as there are very few park amenities.

Reserve now

Death Valley National Park

Well, this one is not called Death Valley for fun. This desert sits on Highway 190 between California and Nevada. It is hazardous with flash flooding happening regularly in summer and fall months. Death Valley National Park is the largest national park outside of Alaska. Containing almost a thousand miles of paved and dirt roads is a great feat. They provide access to all the remote areas. Ninety-one percent of this park is protected, so be courteous and play by the rules.

This place is filled with Barren Salt Flats, massive mountains, and deep canyons that get hit with flash flooding. Make sure you check with local National Park Service to find out if any emergency closures are going on. Prepare and pack carefully so that you can enjoy the situation

Reserve now – There are No reservations at this desert. it is open year-round and pretty much can go wherever you’d like.

Great Dunes National Park

This park contains North America’s tallest dunes and is a recreational hot spot for camping and four-wheel-drive enthusiasts. Great Sand Dunes National Park sits at about 13,600 feet and is one of the highest deserts in the United States. Sitting inside of Colorado, the storms in this place can come in quickly making it very wet and cold very fast. Make sure and pack accordingly.

Summertime is usually the best time to go with highs averaging in the 80’s and lows in the 40’s. Springtime is the worst time to go. Weather can range from being blizzard conditions all the way to swimsuit weather. March and April are the two snowiest months in Colorado.

Reserve now

More: Snowmobile Camping

Is Camping in the Desert Dangerous?

Yes, it is, dangerous if you are inexperienced and not knowledgeable of the areas. There are precautions you need to take in any outdoor situation. Know the weather first and foremost. Flash floods, lightning, snow, rain, and anything else mother nature throws your way. You need to be prepared. Also, the only way to be fully prepared is to know all the aspects of the trip.

Animals and critters are also a concern. From snakes to scorpions. These things are killers if not taken seriously and given their distance. Check all your shoes, bags, tents, and anything else they could get into. It happens all the time.

Is Camping in the Desert Fun?

Yes. Absolutely.

If done right and with caution, this could be the best experience of your life. The beauty of an early morning sunrise of a desert is a unique sight. The dew on blooming desert cactuses is picturesque. I recommend this recreation for the whole family. It is a memory maker and extremely fun atmosphere.

Explore. Relax. Have fun.

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Welcome

Hi, Dennis and Shelly Jackson here, we are the faces behind Campsite Planning. We are parents of 4 great kids and a little dog. And we are sharing some of our experiences with the site. I hope you enjoy and please do not hesitate to contact us for any reason.

Thanks

This site is owned and operated by Docslys Design. Docslys Design is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

How To Camp While Snowmobiling: A Wonderful Ride

How To Camp While Snowmobiling: A Wonderful Ride

….If you ever get the chance to take a trip and go camping while snowmobiling up on the side of a mountain, I suggest you do it. Few things in life are that much fun. Here are a few tips and warnings about this Recreation.

Snowmobiling, when safe is a significant activity, but things can go awry very fast make sure especially during heavy snowfall you have the proper safety equipment and Back-up Plan if the machine goes down. Also, make sure that your camping bag has appropriately been packed for a cold camping trip. Sub-Zero sleeping bags and portable heaters if necessary Etc. if everything is on point and packed for the journey, you will enjoy something like you’ve never experienced before

Camping While Snowmobiling

The very first thing when camping while snowmobiling that needs to be brought up is where and when you are going. Many areas that are covered with snow are designated for certain winter recreational Sports, so you need to make sure that snowmobiling is acceptable, and that camping is acceptable on National Land or BLM land because if you get caught where you’re not supposed to be there are hefty fines and possible jail time.

Another precaution is to always check your local forecast for inclement weather and the possibilities of avalanches if you will be creating an avalanche prone areas. Once all that is figured out you might need to pull a permit to go where you want to and that can be completed at your local National forestry headquarters they should be able to tell you all the information you need to know about the area you will be going and what permits and other passes you may need.

More: How to Camp in the desert

Clothing

Once all the form mentioned items are taken care of, then you can get everything packed up To get ready to head out. You will want to make sure and pack necessary gear for riding and camping in the winter.

One of the huge rules to remember is that no cotton it absorbs the moisture and sweat from your body so easily, and when you get wet it can freeze. so please do not wear cotton underneath your snowmobile clothes

A better first layer is going to be a polyester blend long underwear top and bottom. Make sure these garments aren’t too tight so your body can breathe. Another type of fabric includes silk because of its thin and lightweight makeup that allows your body to dry naturally and keep moisture away from your skin.

Stay warm in this from Amazon

Try wearing more than one layer the more you wear, the more you can take off if you start getting warm and not having to search for more clothes that you did not bring to put on trying to get warmer. You see the logic here you can always take more off, but you can’t put more on.
here is a short list of a few items you might want to pack

  • snowmobile suits 
  • goggles
  • Gloves
  • helmet
  • face mask
  • snowmobile boots
  • heavy duty winter socks
  • stocking cap

Tools

It’s best to bring a friend or a group because you don’t want to get stuck up there with a broken machine if you do end up having an issue at least you’ll have somebody you can ride back with or might have the knowledge to be able to help you fix it if you don’t.

Depending on how far you go out what kind of terrain you will be riding this is probably one of the first things you think about before going on your snowmobile trip. Usually, snowmobiles have a basic kit they come with but if its an older model they could all be scattered in your garage or something.
here’s a list of tools you might need to pack with you

  • Spark plug wrench
  • Flathead and Phillips screwdrivers
  • A tow rope
  • electrical tape
  • a bag of Rags
  • some bungee cords
  • razor knife pliers
  • Extra battery
  • Walkie Talkies

walkie talkie kits

Location

Once you are packed and ready to go, head out, it’s going to be a fun ride. Depending if you’re going by yourself, with a partner or with a group. You’re going to need to find a spot, and when you do find a place, you need to understand where you are. Are you right on a track where other snowmobilers are going to be coming through and waking you guys up in the middle of the night? Or are you away from the main path where you guys can rest and have some privacy.

Another thing to think about or wild animals that might be brought closer to Camp by the noise of people in the surrounding areas you must think it’s not normal to have such sounds in the outdoors and the animals that live there going to be curious and want to check it out.
Make sure you keep food in tight containers and put up that night, so it does not attract animals to Camp by the odor of food.

Gear

Just with any other type of Adventure, you need to be packed correctly. With the right kind of activity, you will be doing. Now being up high and in the snow. You will need a certain amount of tools that you will be bringing along if that’s Towing something behind you or packing it on a backpack and dragging it on your sled then that’s what it is but remember everything you take in you got to bring back so don’t make more than is necessary.

  • 550 Cord
  • Altimeter
  • Cell phone and satellite phone
  • Cookstove (Small)with pot, utensil, and fuel
  • Emergency candles
  • Firestarter
  • Fluorescent tape or flagging
  • GPS-beacon
  • Headlamp
  • Hunting knife
  • Map, compass
  • Multi-tool
  • Saw for wood
  • Shovel (tempered)
  • signal mirror
  • Snow Probe (10 ft min.)
  • Spare batteries
  • Sub temp Sleeping bag (-50)
  • Tinfoil
  • Toilet paper
  • Waterproof lighting source—flint
  • Whistle
  • Winter tent

 

Keeping Your Gear Dry

So at the end of the day, when you get back to your Camp, You’re going to want to dry off. Now if it’s super cold, as soon as you take it off and get into your night gear, it will freeze. What I suggest is to bring a Buddy propane heater with you and that way you can dry your socks, your pants, your gloves, your boots, and anything that got wet throughout the day. That way when you start fresh in the morning, you’re not going to be uncomfortable.

Another option is if you can start a fire to hang a clothesline across over top of the fire from a tree to your machine. And hang your socks above the fire. Of course not close enough to catch on fire, but you get the gist. And if necessary you could lay your stuff on your idling machine it will waste gas, but it will warm up your socks your boots Etc.

Sun

Make sure you wear sunglasses and sunscreen because the glare of the snow is going to torch you your face your eyes everything that is exposed to the air is going to be hit with the Sun. Bring up in the snow and at a higher elevation means that sun’s coming in hot even if it’s behind clouds or it’s gloomy, or you’re in the shade or behind Mountain that doesn’t matter.

80% of the UV radiation is going to be reflected at you compared to at a beach where it’s only 20% coming off the sand that’s a big difference and not to mention because you are so high or closer to the Sun

So sunscreen and sunglasses and don’t forget to reapply sunscreen anytime you think about it. Just put it on. It’s going to help you in the long run, it will also keep your skin from drying out after riding for 8 hours a day.

Be Responsible

By the way, I should have mentioned this earlier in the article. Don’t forget to let your friends and family know which way you are going to travel, or which recreational area you will be staying. Because if they don’t hear back from you by the time you’re supposed to be home, they need to send somebody out to look for you.

Hopefully, that doesn’t happen, and if it does happen hopefully, you are adequately prepared with a GPS beacon or cell phone somebody they can pin your positioning. it’s incredible to go out and have these Great Adventures, but we need to be able to go out and do it safely so we can come home to our families when it’s all said and done because that’s what it’s all about

Conclusion

And finally, when you go camping while snowmobiling, have some fun. We work hard day in and day out to be able to go ride and explore the Wilderness like this. So enjoy it and take lots of pictures. Write it down in a journal. Somehow document what you’re doing because in the future all you have is memories. So pack right, be ready, and let’s hope they’re great memories.

Relax. Explore. Enjoy.

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Welcome

Hi, Dennis and Shelly Jackson here, we are the faces behind Campsite Planning. We are parents of 4 great kids and a little dog. And we are sharing some of our experiences with the site. I hope you enjoy and please do not hesitate to contact us for any reason.

Thanks

This site is owned and operated by Docslys Design. Docslys Design is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

High Altitude Camping With Kids

High Altitude Camping With Kids

High altitude camping can be fun if you are geared up for it right. Now couple that with kids at an elevation of 3000-5000 ft. And high altitude camping with kids is an entirely different experience.

Planning and preparation have to be on point; you could ruin or make your trip. Whichever you prepare for will define that in the end. High elevation camping with kids is very exciting but extremely dangerous. Between altitude sickness, dehydration and sleeplessness the risks are high, but if prepared correctly it can be the best times of your life.

HIGH ALTITUDE CAMPING WITH KIDS

Camping at high altitude

This is very different from the usual camping methods scenarios, where the feeling of lush green leaves stick to your skin, insects swarming on you and breathing in the early morning dew. High altitude camping is entirely different from all that.

Picture yourself standing on a building over 5000 feet high.  This can be like high altitude camping at least the visual aspect. The cold and icy feeling stinging your skin, the dirt in your eyes, slippery and uncomfortable footpaths on the mountain slopes,  all come together when your high altitude camping.

You should not go high altitude camping with kids unless you have a very a precise preparation plan in place. You do not want one of the kids falling ill with High altitude sickness without having the provisions to treat it.

high altitude camping with kids

Breath and take a breath. It took a long time to get up there

Some of these sicknesses may be;

  • headaches
  • dizziness
  • restlessness
  • confusion
  • short breath
  • lack of appetite
  • fatigue
  • nausea
  • short sleep

A study from the wilderness medical society shows that specific factors were likely to contribute to altitude sickness,

They include; dehydration, and ascending altitude, etc.

You as a guide or parent should also realize that kids have difficulties expressing how they feel in regards to altitude sickness, so you might have a hard time finding out exactly what is wrong with them.

More: How to camp in the desert

High Elevation Warnings.

Due to this, some studies have recommended specific viable factors that you should note before heading out high altitude camping with kids.

  • Kids between 1 day to 1-year-old should not be taken on altitude camping trips and locations between 5000 to 8000 feet, generally.
  • You should monitor and supervise kids under the age of 3 very closely during altitude climbs for symptoms of high altitude sickness.
  • Ascension for kids should be slow and gradual.
  • You should monitor kids who have a problem communicating, after about 3000 feet, you should begin the descent.

The study has shown that some physical conditioning for kids can reduce the likelihood of altitude sickness in them. These include;

  • Keeping them hydrated. You need to make sure that the kids have adequate amounts of water and fluid in their system before the ascent to the campsite.
  • Make them eat meals with high carbohydrates regularly. It keeps them sharp and alert.
  • Don’t make the kids climb to the location in one day; it should be at intervals. Preferably 1000 feet should be covered in a day. Any more is pushing their physical limits.
  • Sleep at an altitude between 1000 feet to 5000

You should consider all this and do proper planning before thinking about going high altitude camping with kids.

So that you know, the only cure for altitude sickness is descent. For that reason, you have to avoid it in the first place.

All packed? What’s next?

I am hopeful with all this information, next time you plan on going high altitude camping with kids, you will have made sufficient plans for altitude sicknesses and all other factors that might trigger its likeliness.

This brings us to another critical factor.

Pick up your backpack; it’s going to be a crazy sweet ride.

Camp set up.

This is the next thing you should consider after tackling altitude sickness. I made it clear earlier that high altitude climbing with kids is not at all the same as camping on a lowland campsite; you need to take ample precautions for safety which will naturally increase the amount of fun you will want the kids to enjoy.

Here are some things to note:

  • Pick a shelter out of the wind and possible falling rocks

During ascent, avoid camping on mountain passes that can be wind tunnels.

  • Make use of established campsites.

The reasoning for this is not that far fetched. Established campsites have been used multiple times, so there are safer and more reliable and most likely have provisions in them.

  • Hold your gear down with massive stones to avoid them from being blown away by gusts of wind.

It can get super crazy windy on a mountain. You need to make sure that your gear is solidly held down by heavy objects or you might find yourself running after your belongings, one after the other.

Picture one of your kids having his snacks all packed into a bag which happens to get blown away by the heavy wind, that kid is not going to be very happy. That kid is going to create all the trouble he can; he might cry, pout and be generally inactive during the rest of the camping trip.

If you still don’t get the picture, think about your maps and camping gear being blown away, all your preparations gone. You would be left with nothing but to improvise for the rest of the camping trip and probably need to turn downhill. You wouldn’t want that. So stay smart and stay geared down.

high altitude camping with kids

Watch where you step dangers are everywhere

  • Avoid ridges and exposed ground.

The primary reason why you should avoid types of places when going high altitude camping with kids is that they are usually a hot zone for lightning strikes. So it’s best to stay as far away from them as you can.

  • Shanks boots

    . Be sure the kids have shanks boots. You never know what part of the mountain might have ice on it. Boots with crampons are explicitly built for ice gripping.

 

  • Use an altimeter.

Make sure you have an altimeter in your gear. It is used to measure the altitude and changes in the atmospheric pressure. Very important.

  • Sleeping bags.

    Your kid’s high altitude sleeping bag is key to the success and survival for a high altitude camping experience. The right sleeping bag can enhance a good night sleep for a kid camping at high altitude.

Camping and cooking.

We all know how vital the right food is to kids. The importance of this increase by 200% especially with kids going high altitude camping. You need to keep their spirit up and their energy high.  So, for cooking, eating and drinking at high altitudes, here are some things you should take into consideration.

  • Bring your own wood. Finding dry wood can be hard at the peak or mountain pass as you To be on the safer side, pack your own dry wood.
  • Sometimes wood can be stressful. Carrying that much load while climbing over 3000 feet can be worse. To ease the stress, you may substitute wood for stoves and camping gas.
  • Make sure the kids drink a lot of water. During high altitude camping, it is found that adults urinate more and so do kids. To keep them hydrated, make sure they take in as much water as they can.
  • To reiterate my earlier point, stuff them full of carbohydrates. It will help the kids remain energetic.

Sanitation guide for altitude camping.

It may come across as common sense. However, most of these tips will steadily affect the success of your kid’s camping experience, sanitation included. You sure would not want the wind blowing back towards you as you urinate or an already used item not put away correctly, or still, kids coming in contact with the already decomposing material used days earlier, it can be traumatic for the kid. So, here are some things to take note of:

  • Make sure the kids have a portable WAG bag. Waste Alleviation Gelling (WAG) bag is a biodegradable bag which contains a powder that gels waste, neutralizes odor and starts the decay process immediately. It is also puncture resistant, so you have nothing to worry about carrying it along with you on your ascent.
  • Make sure the kids do not carry extra stuff they don’t need. This reduces the amount of trash they may need to dispose of.
  • Try to bury any trash by digging the ground with a small shovel.

Additional tips

Kids are unpredictable, so no matter how much planning you have made, they can surprise you. Therefore, it always advisable to have extra items just in case something goes wrong.

Kids want to have fun; they love to run around and jump. When you are up in a high elevation zone, try as much as possible to control the pace of the kids, so they don’t tire out before the main ascent begins. You should have a set target for each day of rising; you don’t want to carry some of the kids on your back, that will be too tiresome. So, ensure moderate elevation changes.

Since this is high altitude climbing with kids, you are going to be super close to the sun. Having good UV rated protective sunglasses will surely help your eyes and those of the kids as well.

Ensure the kids carry along SPF sunscreen to avoid sunburns.

high altitude camping with kids

You made it safe and sound. What a rush!

There is so much fun you can have on the mountaintop, explore. There is never a dull moment with kids

Get set and off you go!!!

High Altitude climbing with kids can is a daunting task for sure.  It will blow your mind away; adventuring with kids will give you double the fun. So fly on, enjoy the view, take pictures and have a blast. Do not forget to share your experience. We can’t wait to read your story.

 

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Welcome

Hi, Dennis and Shelly Jackson here, we are the faces behind Campsite Planning. We are parents of 4 great kids and a little dog. And we are sharing some of our experiences with the site. I hope you enjoy and please do not hesitate to contact us for any reason.

Thanks

This site is owned and operated by Docslys Design. Docslys Design is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

Camping With A Two Year Old: 10 Rules To Keep Your Sanity

Camping With A Two Year Old: 10 Rules To Keep Your Sanity

Camping with a two-year-old can be an enjoyable experience. All the critical values of nature you can teach them. However, let me ask this question. What if they change? You know what I mean. They flip that switch, and you are not in control anymore. Can you keep your sanity intact?

The mind of a two-year-old is quite simple. They use the right side of the brain. That would be the impulse side if you were wondering. They have no control over it. That develops on the left side. So they pee in weird areas, run around shrieking entirely buck naked, and they color their faces with a permanent marker, just to name a few. They are not logical or patient. It’s just science! So relax and be patient because we can. Here are “10 rules to keep your sanity” when camping with a two-year-old.

A majority of people with kids have experienced the feeling of absolute frustration. As your two-year-old is having a nuclear “not listening” meltdown in the middle of the grocery store. Running from you, and grabbing everything that they can throw on the floor. You feel as if you are the worst parental figure in the world, with all the eyes digging into your back. Don’t worry. Follow these “10 rules to keep your sanity” to ease the stress just a little.

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1) Pack the best as you can – If you have all your camping gear packed away in totes already and have to throw them in the car, then you can skip to the next rule. Big giant rubber made totes with lids is the way to go. They are lightweight, and you can stuff everything in there to keep it dry. You do not want to spend hours packing and unpacking. You will go crazy when she is running around you grabbing stuff and tripping over the pots and pans. Trust me. A good pack is the best way to start the trip.

2) Arrive early as possible – if you can make it out of the house as soon as you can, and get to your camping spot, you will be ahead of the curve already. It gives you time to set up the tent while taking your time. If you were to arrive too late, you would be pressed to get the vehicles unloaded, tent set up, the fire started, food prepped and made, and so on. The whole reason to go camping with a two-year-old, in my opinion, is to relax and let the family enjoy their time together in the outdoors. Learning and playing together is what it is about.

3.) Keep her busy – Have her help you with camp set up, as much as possible. I usually will hand her the plastic stakes and tell her to go and pound these into the ground so that daddy can tie the tent to them. Of course, the task cannot be done. However, it keeps her hands busy, and she gets to help. It also gives her a sense of responsibility.camping with a two year old

Also, let her help put the tent poles together. I will hold one end and make her snap them together. It is a small task, but she seems to love it. I have her hold the poles as I slide them through to the other side one by one until the tent is up and we then can start on the Bedding.

She will also get the task of putting pillows on the air mattresses. I’ll say “now the pillows,” and she will walk them over and lay them down. In mommy’s spot then daddy’s, then she will put one on hers. If possible do not let her sleep with you she will get used to it, and as she grows up, she might have problems sleeping in her tent.

4) Have a large size tent – This is a big deal especially if the weather is not going to be very generous. If you can make it work, get the biggest tent possible that is not too extreme. The reason is that it gives her a safe place to play and move around in the evening time and bad weather. If she can release a little bit of steam before bed, it will help.

Another reason for a big tent when camping with a two-year-old is that you do not want to feel cramped. Even though this article is about camping with a two-year-old, you don’t want to make the situation any more stressful than it should be. A full tent is annoying. You cannot move around and change clothes comfortably. So give yourself some room to breathe as well.

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5) Plan out you snack and meals – If you go camping with a two-year-old and have no meal plan things can go sideways very quickly. If she wants snacks right away, that is fine, but limits are a necessity. She might have the idea because you are not at home, that she can have more or get something special.

I suggest not going away from usual home habits. Have a set time for dinner and not let her spoil it by eating marshmallow and graham crackers before its actually s’mores time (guilty as charged). Bring fruits and vegetable for snacks. Candy will give her a sugar high. Then she will burn out, and that can trigger her to become that little one we are trying to suppress.

Breakfast is the most important meal when camping with a two-year-old. A lot of time, everyone is already tired from the day’s recreation, that dinner is often a thrown together quick meal. Nevertheless, breakfast is where you go “hard in the paint.” By that, I mean put your resources into this. Pump that baby full of protein so she can go most of the day strong. This, in turn, will keep her happy. With that, my friend keeps you happy.

6) Drawing and color crayons – Now we all know that no matter how much we keep her busy, we as a parent are going to need some us time. Bringing crayons and paper is an excellent idea to keep her busy. Just set her down in the tent for rest time, let her draw and color until she’s blue in the face. It might not sound like a lot, but at this time, you can press some coffee, make lunch, or use the bathroom. It rests for mom and dad, and that is a key to keeping that sanity in sight.

7) No toys allowed – This is huge. We all want to believe that getting outdoors is essential, and it is, very much so. So why do we continuously bring crap from home with us when we visit. I see it so often when camping, Kids on tablets, phones and other electronics. I mean how they are even keeping them charged. Lol.

When camping we try not to allow ordinary “toys” to come with us. We want her to explore and find natural “toys” in the woods to play with. Not only does it help with exploration and independence. But it teaches her that material objects are just not that important. I say that as I am typing on my PC with two monitors. Nevertheless, you get what I am saying. Hopefully.

8) Go for a walk – Not only is a walk a great exercise while camping with a two-year-old, but it’s also a great “tiring them out” type activity. Take them down to the water if there is some nearby. Stop and chat with other campers most people are friendly and will be good company. camping with a two year oldIf there are hiking trails, do a half mile or more and let her walk as long as she can.

I know that does not work too well as we have a super cool carrier that my wife wears a lot. Even then, it is still a relaxing and fun experience. All of these are to keep her busy as not to have a fit. But also for you as a parent to not get overwhelmed with the children. Focus on your thought and wellbeing as well. How about you soak in some scenes too!

9) Teach them until they get bored – these kids are sponges at this age. Teach them everything you can about the wilderness and camping. Point to trees and shrubs let them feel them and experience what it is like to really, be out in nature. Let them get dirty while digging in the dirt.

Take them to some water and show them what a crawdad is. When camping with a two-year-old trying not to scold them if they run too far in front of you. Let them enjoy the new scenery. Do not forget that we have been there and had knowledge of what’s out there. They do not. Being that young, even if they have been out before, might not remember. A new to them experience, so try to treat it like that.

10) Bring bedtime books – Bedtime is where we have some of our major issues. She knows its bedtime but does not want to miss all the fun that we will be having once she is asleep. We get it but bedtime is bedtime so bringing a bedtime book and reading it under the low light of a lantern would put the best of us daylong coffee drinkers asleep fast. They are no different.

Bonus) – Bug spray or bracelets for the little ones – Make sure when you camp with a two-year-old you come ready for the bugs. Although they don’t bother kids as much as adults if she is eaten up you will hear about it all night because she cannot sleep. Also, that transfers to the rest of the trip because she will be tired the rest of the way.

Have fun. Enjoy. Relax.

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Welcome

Hi, Dennis and Shelly Jackson here, we are the faces behind Campsite Planning. We are parents of 4 great kids and a little dog. And we are sharing some of our experiences with the site. I hope you enjoy and please do not hesitate to contact us for any reason.

Thanks

This site is owned and operated by Docslys Design. Docslys Design is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

Dispersed Camping: How To Rough It For Newbies

Dispersed Camping: How To Rough It For Newbies

Dispersed Camping It isn’t a household word. I was having a conversation with a guy from work, and I was telling him about a dispersed camping trip I was getting ready for. He was looking at me as if I was nuts. He had no clue what that was. I decided I would write this post to him. Hope to see you out there.

Dispersed Camping is a saying that people use for camping anywhere in a National Forest that is not inside of a managed campground. This style is very basic. Normally there is no water besides creeks or rivers, No toilets so walking and digging a latrine is necessary, no tables fire rings or any other amenities that normal campgrounds usually have. In addition, cleanup is especially important. This to me is a very special kind of camping and I enjoy it very much. Let us dive a little deeper into the recreation of Dispersed Camping.

Roughing it

People who enjoy dispersed camping fit into two main groups.

You have your penny pinchers who love to save money by not paying for the reservation fee or parking fees. In addition, will deal with the lack of amenities during the evening then drive to the nearest campground to wash up or use the toilets.

The other kind is nomadic at heart. They are the kind of people who love to be outdoors. Live within nature. Typically have no issues with solitude, and self-reliance is a key feature of their personality. The lack of a toilet or fire pit is not a real concern.

Ask yourself. Are you able to “Rough It” if it meant you are saving 20 bucks a night? If so, you are a minority. Because of the Primitive style of dispersed camping a little more skill and responsibility is in order. It is ideal to know how to camp in this style and be able to respect nature and not ruin the areas for future campers.

A rule of thumb is that you always bring out more than you brought in. That means do not leave your trash, and if you can, take out any that you see. Before heading out to try your hand at this extraordinary experience please be advised of the rules and regulations of the region. They are in place to ensure people stay safe and that nature stays intact.

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Dispersed Camping Areas

Dispersed camping in certain locations is acceptable in national forests, such as the Department of Natural resources (DNR), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). You can research your areas on their websites to find out if there is any closure or emergencies happening at the time.

Campsites in these areas are first to come first serve that means you might need to get out of the house a little earlier if you know you’re heading to a more populated area.

Depending on the region you live in the days allowed to camp in the same spot is limited. Ten to fifteen days in a thirty day period is the max I believe. However, it does vary so make sure and plans your trip accordingly.

Campfires in Camp

Campfires permitted in designated camping spots only. We all know what the price can be if a large fire is sparked from a campground. More rules, regulations, and the possibility of them closing down the areas for a very long time or permanently. In a designated dispersed campground, gathering natural firewood is not legal. Purchasing your own wood on the way to the camping spot or bringing it from home will be the only way to have it without receiving a fine if caught.

This “primitive” style of camping is wonderful, and if you are into it then great. If not that is great too. Just remember in developed areas, you cannot clear brush and debris to set up a camping spot. You must use the designated area for tent camping. Known as a best practice, do not set up a camp closer than 150-200 feet from the water source. You can intimidate wildlife from its natural drinking and resting areas.

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WHERE TO GO TO THE BATHROOM

Needed Items Two plastic baggies One latrine shovel or digging device (stick) Toilet paper (leaves or other natural elements) This is what a lot of people is the biggest difference in dispersed camping and regular campground camping. Even in a pay to play campground, the bathrooms are disgusting. There are many more germs in one of those pit crappers than there ever will be out in the woods. I am just saying.

I get the comfort of a toilet, compared to a tree. Believe me. I am married and have four kids and I know that taking them along on a dispersed camping trip is not the best of choices. My children 12, 11, 11, and 2 and my wife do not think a tree or bush is the best place to go potty. I totally understand. It is not user-friendly for one. You run the risk of soiling yourself on accident if you are not very experienced at the whole crapping outside thing.

I repeat this but stay 200 feet away from any water source, when going to the bathroom. You will want to find a nice flat area. With soft soil so that digging a hole will not be too difficult. Next, you need to decide if you are a squatter, a tree leaner or a catcher. These are the three main styles of doing the deed when out camping without the toilet. I suggest not to squat that gets tiring after a bit. Once you figure out your plan of attack. Locate the drop zone and dig yourself a hole, about eight inches wide by eight inches deep. Go ahead and do your doo at this point. Once finished do not forget to cover it back up with dirt.

Some places allow the burial of the toilet paper but most areas do not. So you must fold it up and stash it in the first baggy. Then stick it in the second one for good measure and dispose of in your trash haul out when you leave the area. That was Easy right? That part is a key factor in may peoples decision not to go dispersed camping, believe it or not.

 Water use

If you are fortunate enough to be around a water source, try not to disturb too much of the area and if you notice game trails or resting areas leave them be. I hope that you can bring your own drinking water so you do not have to boil or treat any to keep hydrated. If need to get your drinking water naturally. You will need to be extremely careful of where you gather your liquids.

Check that there are no feces in the surrounding area. Along with carcasses of animals that might have gotten sick. That is not a good sign. Luckily, nowadays they have straws that filter the water while you are drinking it. Just remember to boil your water. Once brought to a boil. One minute of rolling boil will purify the water. If you are in higher elevations though like 2000 ft. or higher you will need to triple that time.

Trash out pack out

When you are super fun time is over, and you have had all the relaxation you can take. it’ll be time to pack up camp and head back to civilization. YAY! (Sarcastic). Your camp cleanup is probably the most important aspect of your camping trip. The more you can take out, the happier everyone will be.

In addition, the forestry departments will not have any ammo to close down the campgrounds. Make especially sure that your camping spot is perfectly clean. No beer cans, paper plates, or little propane bottle caps. (You would not believe how many of those I have found over the years). If possible, try to remove garbage that was there as well every little bit helps.

Regions

I live in the Pacific Northwest and I am very lucky to have cascade mountain range and the Pacific coast mountain range on both sides of me. It makes for excellent recreational endeavors. The region here is going to be different from the region in Utah. I have linked local sites, but I am sure you can find what you are looking for, now that you have finished this article.

Conclusion

Please let me know in the comments if you have experienced dispersed camping, in your region. In addition, how it probably differs from mine. I would love to hear about it. To finish this article I just want to say, do not let the wilderness scare you. Go out, explore, and stand in a meadow or at the base of a mountain. Hopefully, in the future, we will be able to remember all this beauty.

I do hope my children will be able to share the wonders that lie out there with their children. At the pace, the forests are disappearing right now they might not have that chance. So for now;

Have fun. Explore. Relax.

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Welcome

Hi, Dennis and Shelly Jackson here, we are the faces behind Campsite Planning. We are parents of 4 great kids and a little dog. And we are sharing some of our experiences with the site. I hope you enjoy and please do not hesitate to contact us for any reason.

Thanks

This site is owned and operated by Docslys Design. Docslys Design is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

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